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see them change. they are doing very well. the most exciting thing, our work is about empowering the girls. these girls can say no to being cut. they can dream of becoming lawyers, teachers, doctors, and we see my daughter do better than my son. i came back for girls in my community don't have to negotiate like i did to accept their dreams. that's why i wake up every morning. >> what a great smile. how inspiring. >>> on monday, soledad will have a sitdown interview with facebook coo sheryl sandberg. >> cnn newsroom with carol costello starts now. >>> happening now in the newsroom -- a gay marriage stunner. >> i'm announced today a change of heart. >> staunch ohio conservative rob portman, a dramatic reversal, backing same-sex marriage after his own son comes out. >> i now believe people ought to have the right to get married. >> politics getting very personal. also, knife fight. >> the small pocket knife is not going to result in a catastrophic failure of an aircraft. >> the tsa chief outspoken and outfront. we'll talk to one tsa agent. >> a really smart smartphone. the new samsu
to listen. we're against the changed cpi. but we're keeping the doors open. we want to hear what the president has to say and i always believe that he has an open mind and an open heart. but it's up to many of us. to keep the fight going. >> we are going to find out. no question about it. thanks for your time tonight. i appreciate it. >> thanks. >> and that is the ed show. tomorrow night at 8:00 eastern, my exclusive interview with the man who shot the 47% video. good evening, rachel. >> i'm so looking forward to that. thank you for joining us this hour. ed schultz is going to be joining us later this hour because his show has landed a really big scoop that is going to be airing tomorrow night. i want to get a chance to talk to ed about what they've got. it's coming up later to be the. but there's lot going on today. the president meeting with the sultan of brunei. also, chuck hagel. who just returned from afghanistan. that trip marked by two u.s. soldiers killed. also, we learned today that the helicopter crash in southern afghanistan killed five u.s. service members. although n
in the caucus in the senate says he is certainly not happy and he thinks this change is dangerous and he spoke to reporters on sunday, which is rare. here is what he had to say. >> the tsa ought to smell the coffee. >> reporter: you might call them pocket knives or swiss army knives, have blades smaller than 2.6 inches, a little bit longer than, say, your house key. lonts list of newly allowed things to carry on are ski poles, lacrosse stick and bill yard cues. of course, frederica, not hearing many arguments about those things, clearly unwieldy, it is the knifes that are the main issue here. as senator schumer saying, he thinks because they can folksily hurt an individual, that's one reason that flight attendants are very concerned about this as well. tsa you however, sees things very differently. from tsa's perspective this is about their job being a priority on trying to prevent terrorists from taking over an entire plane. the tsa says that cockpits are protected now, small knifes can no longer get a terrorist to the plane's controls but the tsa says hunting for those knives can distract th
of a new pope present a chance for institutional change? plus, another installment of this week in voter suppression. >>> how to walk the fine line when protecting our streets. but first, the rape case igniting a national conversation and turning one small town upside down. good morning. i'm joy reid filling in for melissa harris-perry. a note of caution for parents watching this morning. we're getting started with a very sensitive story, so you may want to send children out of the room. this week two high school football stars from steubenville, ohio, went on trial after being accused of raping a 16-year-old girl from just across the ohio river, in nearby west virginia. now a crime and justice story in a small town like steubenville isn't usually the makings of national news and the alleged events on the night in question are sadly not remarkable for their rarity. we know that one in six american women is a survivor of an attempted or completed sexual assault. and we know 44% of survivors are under the age of 18. but thanks to an unusual aspect of this case, we all know now in graphic d
. but it is not true this time. we have become a different country the last three months. newtown changed us. >>> in 1996, the senate's most conservative member, republican jessie helms voted for the defense of marriage act, not surprisingly. today, jessie helms' senate seat is occupied by a democrat, kay hagan, who announced support for marriage equality. that seat change was noticed by the supreme court today as they considered the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act. day two of high stakes arguments at the high court. >> the nation's highest court taking up the defense of marriage act. >> federal ban on same-sex marriage. >> today's doma arguments concern same sex couples already married. >> at the center of this, 83-year-old edith windsor. >> i am an out lesbian who sued the united states of america. >> doma barred the irs from recognizing her marriage. >> recognizing marriage to her partner of 44 years. >> they were making a stranger of this person i lived with and loved. >> the court's liberals were strongly attacking doma. >> i think there are five votes to strike it down
, not a popularity contest. not to move. people are voting this way. change all the doctrine and yet at the same time that is a challenge for the american church. how do you keep up with what people consider to be modern times, but keep to a doctrine that is obviously based in t way past, in history? >> this is an issue. because people do have it in their minds that this is a democracy and that polls are the things that make the decisions. it's not. we're dealing with what we call eternal truth. the eternal truth of our faith and don't really change that much. we said earlier in the program, the key is the way you delivery the message. that's what people will look for in the next 40 years. >> it will endear him to the audience or push him to the audience. john paul ii, what people loved about him was the delivery of the message in a personal way. >> have the ability to engage the culture and have the conversation is key. >> pope john paul was 59, only two years older than me, when he became the pope. and we watched him become a grandfather. benedict walked out to the world statement stage as a grandf
. there is no nice way to tell seniors you're changing social security. to tell latinos we're profiling you, we're suppressing your vote. we don't need a smile. we need new policies. thank you for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> religious war. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. i'm not washington. let me start tonight with this. you can't steer a car with the engine off. it's problem with the republican party today. get rid of the cultural right, abortion and gay marriage, all those began who moving to the republican party over prayer in public school years ago and you kill one giant engine. get rid of the whackos as john mccain cats them and you lose another engine. all the libertarians who just want government out of their face and out of their lives and you kell another engine. try to do what reince priebus is doing right now and you will see the problem, try steering the car with your engine dead. try steering the political party once you kill the motor. you set out to kill the big motors of the republican party itself. for pr
conservative. in a cnn exclusive, senator rob portman explains the personal reasons behind his change of heart. >>> and a bizarre and tragic medical mystery. a man dies after receiving a transplanted kidney tainted with rabies. how could this happen in the united states of america? how many other people are at risk right now? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." forget all those wacky scenes of north korea's leader joking around with dennis rodman. the united states, the obama administration, right now taking the north's threats of a nuclear attack very seriously. the pentagon has just announced it will beef up america's defense missile systems out on the west coast. in california, oregon, washington state. let's go straight to cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence, watching what's going on. chris, a lot of us are stunned by this decision but update us on what is going on. >> wolf, we just came out of a briefing where we learned the pentagon is going to spend a billion dollars to put new intercepter missiles on the west coast. now, that plan includes react investigating a mi
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change to the way that the cost of living increases are calculated. real dollars represent a cut over a time window. my chetheory is this is all a g in which they reduce the democrats into advocating the cuts to them so they can turn around and run against democrats for entitlements. this is what they did in 2012. the president came up with ways of cutting medicare and then what did romney do? they said look at their white house. this is what they have done every single time. and what they are trying to do is with their strategy of gridlock convince them that they are so dysfunction al that they get rid of it. >> they said the president won't tackle the entitlement program and he wants to cut medicare. >> and here is harry reid sniffing out the same logic that we saw in the republican alternative. that would have given the president more digression for the cuts. >> they said we are going to cut off three fingers. we want the president to decide which finger goes first. and that is about it. we have tried everything we can and they will not budge on anything. period. >> i have been goi
that you need your oil changed you got to bring it in. if your tires need to be rotated, you have to get that done as well. jackie, tell me why somebody should bring they're car here to the ford dealership for service instead of any one of those other places out there. they are going to take care of my car because this is where it came from. price is right no problem, they make you feel like you're a family. get a synthetic blend oil change, tire rotation and much more, $29.95 after $10.00 rebate. if you take care of your car your car will take care of you. >>> it used to be that the president of the united states every week would deliver a national radio address to the country. fdr was the first president to start doing a weekly radio address, but it was a tradition that stuck even well into the 2000s. it was saturday, right on cue there was president george w. bush delivering his weekly radio address, which is kind of weird and charming, right? technologically we had come a long ways since the radio by the time george w. bush was still doing this. but now it's sort of belatedly, the we
're trying to do. but governor bush seemed to change his stance somewhat during a series of recent interviews prompting tough criticism from senate majority leader harry reid. >> let's wait for a few minutes and see how jeb bush changes his mind again. his opinion on immigration is not evolving. it's devolving. he keeps going backwards. i think he's frankly made a fool of himself the last 24 hours. frankly, on this issue, i don't think jeb bush is a florida leader. i think marco rubio is. bush has been elected to nothing lately. rubio is the leader on immigration. >> okay. joe, a new poll by latino decisions shows immigration reform is by far the most important issue for hispanic voters. that's by the economy and jobs, education and health care. >> john heilemann, let's talk, john heilemann, about your next book. bush -- "game change 2016." i think this may have to be the opening scene of jeb getting out of a cab in the middle of the dark, you know, in a cold march morning and walking into the "today" show when announcing that he's changed his mind. i mean, the second i heard it, i said, the
very highly of that lion. >> paul, does this change the way you view these animals? >> no. not at all. in fact, it makes me view them with more love and interest than ever before because i will always think of her now whenever i see a lion or a tiger or a big cat, because these were the loves of her life. and i will think of her every single time now i see one of those. and how much she would have enjoyed being there and working with them. no, it doesn't change anything. >> listen, i appreciate both of you taking the time to let everybody get to know her better and get to know her passions and what she loved and died doing what she loved. paul, thank you, and paul ryan, i wish you peace and strength in the days ahead. >> thank you. >> thanks for letting us tell her story to you. >> fatal attacks like this aren't common, but they happen. 25 people have been killed by big cats in the last five years. jack hanna joins me now. as we heard ted rowlands report, this animal got into an area that was supposed to be secure. i just want to show our viewers the large enclosure where dianna was a
>> dana: i am going -- >> greg: i am changing my one more thing. we found out that andrea tantaros has a new radio show in january. debuted at number seven in the country. congratulations to andrea. she is well deserved. there are people in front of her that i think would not be, it wouldn't a great loss. >> greg: how nice of you? are you suggesting that could be killed? >> bob: you could do it that way. >> andrea: don't do anything rash. >> bob: i was one of the first guest on your show, right? >> andrea: the first guest. >> bob: you didn't do too well. >> andrea: you should come back. we have a game show for you. >> bob: you asked me ridiculous questions. >> andrea: we played a game show. played one with eric, too. rock and load with eric. played a country music quiz with dana. >> eric: congratulations. thank you. >> andrea: the work is very, very hard. >> eric: my turn? >> greg: yes, eric. >> eric: full screen breathe. one more time. there is still time. open hour white house. hashtag it and trend it. trending on and off all day. if you want to twitter. @presssec. that is jay ca
. >>> this tuesday, marking ten years since the start of the iraq war. has our opinion of the conflict changed since then? we've got a new poll for you that shows time may not heal all wounds. >>> and the carnival legend is back in tampa after technical difficulties. it is the latest in a series of problems for the beleaguered carnival cruise line. es around the world that sell stolen identities? >> 30-year-old american man, excellent credit rating. >> announcer: lifelock monitors thousands of these sites 24 hours a day. and if we discover any of our members' data for sale, lifelock is there with the most comprehensive identity theft protection available. [♪...] [squealing, crash] call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today. >>> a deadly scene at a northern california racetrack last night. there was an accident during warm-up before the race began. a 68-year-old man and a 14-year-old boy were killed when a car lost control and slammed into the pit area at the marysville raceway. the race announcer described what he saw. >> when i saw people running so rapidly towards that area i thought it was
the deficit? paul ryan says no. >> at least budgets are passing around here for a change. the government's going to have to learn to do more with less, it's not the government's money, it's the people's money. >> the senate democrats are considering a number of balances ever-- >> and house committee chair paul ryan telling us republicans and democrats are still world's apart. well, that is an understatement. we saw that just an hour ago. the democratic-led senate defeating the ryan house budget 40-59. so is there any hope left? here is congressman paul ryan. >> great to see you. >> great it to see you again. >> greta: i want to talk about the budget that passed today, i imagine you're happy. >> we're very happy. we passed a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the necessary means to a healthier economy, it creates more jobs and helps people keep more of hard earned money and a contrast to the other budgets that are passing. at least budgets are passing here for a change,
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
california's prop 89 and the federal defense of marriage act or doma. carl cameron examines the changing culture on the issue and big money behind it. >> reporter: political spending spiked in the 2012 election side. they spent $42 million and opponents spent $11 million. maine and maryland legalize same-sex marriage by popular votes. >> step by step, town by town, federal equality. >> reporter: new york based gay rights group spent $7 million in the last two years. the mayor donated $250,000. gates foundation kicked in half a million and pe sogs contributed 2 beaten $5 million. the biggest in denver based gill foundation, it doled out $14 million for gay efforts in the last few years. the largest gay rights organization in washington, d.c. is the human rights campaign, 30 years old, 1.5 million members and $30 million annual budget. there are dozens of gay rights groups with w countless chapters including a growing group on the right. but compared to the billions spent on modern political campaigns, money behind gay rights initiatives is fairly small. popular entertainment and coverage
another prime example. if we were to do those things, it would change the psyche in congress, get people more courage and get us closer to doing things you've written about over the years. >>> we want to mark another important anniversary. and officials say, it has news to go with it. at least 56 people were killed this morning in explosions across iraq. that's exactly ten years after then president bush announced the u.s. invasion. most of today's attacks were car bombings around baghdad, including one near major government offices and foreign embassies. we're still getting information in on that in terms of casualties and injuries. elizabeth, you first, ten years later, where are we? well, it's a very difficult anniversary. no one remembers this fondly at all. the iraqis certainly don't remember this well. they're not marking this anniversary at all. i also think that the war changed fundamentally the way the united states thinks about war. look at how reluctant the president is right now to intervene in syria in a serious way. look at how reluctant the pentagon was to go to war to int
the change of a latitude. >> why are you so confident in that attitude? how many states permit gay couples to marry? >> today? nine, your honor. >> nine. so there has been this sea change between now and 1996? >> i think with respect to the understanding of gay people and their relationship, i think there is a sea change. >> i suppose the sea change has a lot to do with the force and effectiveness of people supporting your side of the case? >> the chief justice of the united states supreme court also faulted president obama for enforcing doma but not defending it. >> if he has made a determination that executing the law by enforcing the terms is unconstitutional, i don't see why he doesn't have the courage of his convictions and execute, not only the stat us, but do it consistent with his view of the constitution, rather than saying we will wait until the supreme court says we have no choice. >> the white house says they enforce plenty of laws he doesn't agree with. >> the justices were not leaving much drama there. but i can tell it you who has been silent in washington this week and that
on something like gay rights opinions are changing fast. on the other side of that question, how cognizant are the justices of how their actions shape the country's view of the court? the country's view of that institution that they represent and its legitimacy in our system of government. a couple of months ago former justice sandra day o'connor did a interview in parade magazine of all place in which she was asked about public approval ratings for supreme court justices. public approval of the justices had dropped from something like two-thirds, roughly 66% in the late 1980s down to 44% now. justice o'connor responded by saying she thought that drop was disturbing, and that, quote, i thinkurmre may have been a turning point. she publishes a remarkable photograph that have i not seen anywhere else before i saw it in this book. it's taken on inauguration day this 2001. justice o'connor, her husband on the right, justice scalia and chief justice rehnquist are waiting for the inauguration of george w. bush to start. an inauguration made possible by virtue of the decision bush v. gore. and i
. >>> coming up next, a pretty st change of position for one of our former presidents. why mr. clinton signed the defense of marriage act but now says that just never should have happened. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the next wave of italians has come to america, and the fiat 500 with beats audio is rockin' the block. the italian designed fiat 500. new griddle-melts to yourime usual breakfast sandwich.k. a lot more flavor. [ anouncer ] ihop's new griddle melts... made fresh and hot! hand crafted just for you. it's like a sexy sandwich. [ anouncer ] compare new griddle melts yourself. just $4.99. it's an epic breakfast sandwich. two. three. my credit card rewards are easy to remember with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. [ female announcer ] from
suggested no other policy changes. >> to be clear, our principles are sound. it all goes back to what our moms used to tell us. it's not just what you say, it's how we say it. it's not about altering our principles. i think it is about the way we communicate. >> the republican who communicates the most responded this way. >> that's not at all what they've got to do. all they have to do, the republican party lost because it is not conservative. it didn't get its base out in the 2012 election. >> that's been a real republican problem, you give people the impression they're not wanted. >> no, we don't. my point is we don't do that. and it's going to be a big mistake if the republican party thinks they're doing that. who is doing that? that convention was story after story after story of the american dream, being realized, by people of so-called diversity. if anything scared people about our convention, it was the notion of hard work in the era of food stamps and unemployment compensation. the republican battle has got to be to reshape what is thought about them, not who they are and what the
patrol, airport security, doom and gloom. wait a minute, here is the question.... >> you change your tune on me, sean. i was here three years ago. the summer of recovery which you love to mock, you were willing to blame every traffic jam in america on the repaving of roads on the stimulus. now when we're actually going to cut a bunch of programs. >> we're going to cut military readiness. >> now you don't want to do it. >> how much was money did this president spend in 2008, you know the answer to that. how much did he spend? >> he wasn't the president in 2008. >> sean: excuse me, 2009. how much did he spend? >> he spent only a small amount more than was projected. >> sean: how much? >> it barely more than what was projected. >> sean: how much? >> barely more than what was projected. >> sean: here is the thing, spending has gone up 20% almost across the board under obama in four years. we have $6 trillion new obama debt, 20 million in o food stamps, one in six in poverty. wait a minute -- this year we are going to spend about the same probably more than we spent last year. explain to ameri
that would change the topic of the conversation away from the primary thing that was most important to me. i thought it was too important for me to just stand-up and say hey, i did it and try to get a little bit of fame. >> mr. romney, at that point in that tape says he wants you to put out the full tape. what was your response? >> let's do it. he asked for it, let's do it. called it a snippet insinuating it was taken out of context. so, at that point, he asked for it, so i decided to give it to him. >> president obama used your material to close a debate at a very crucial time after his first debate was heavily criticized. this was his closing statement. what was going through your mind? >> it was the last line of the debate. i was sitting on the edge of my couch at the time. i was watching the first debate and there was no mention of it. you know, there was certainly a cheer erupted in the room at the time. i was thrilled that he hit him with it when he did. you know, it was well done. it worked out exactly the way i hoped it would. i'm thrilled he mentioned it. i think he used it to great
party, hubert humphry had no idea how to end the war. when you needed was total change at the white house. the democrats had to go to nixon could come in and end vietnam. but then less than a week before the election, it all went horribly wrong for richard nixon, because less than a week before election, on halloween night, 1968, the democratic president, lbj, went on tv in a surprise nationally televised address. he made a surprise announcement that peace was at hand. the communist side, the vietnamese side was going to be make concessions at peace talks. the south vietnamese were going to agree to a deal. peace was at hand. the terms were all set. peace was at hand. in recognition of the fact that peace was about to be declared, the united states would step back right away and stop all military operations in vehement. lbj said that on thursday night. the election was going to be tuesday. turns out the democrats know how to end this war. that was bad news for richard nixon, but good news for the country who wanted the war to be over. good news for the people fighting the war. this
ideas. we're taking concrete actions to change course. i have unequivocally prohibited the use of torture by the united states, and i have ordered the prison at guantanamo by early next year. >> while the united states has done much to promote peace and prosperity we have at times been disengaged and we thought to dictate our terms. >> sean: ambassador, arrogant, derisive and contrary to our deals and guilty of torture and we're giving money to the muslim brotherhood. what is wrong were that? >> those kinds of comments don't win us any friends and seen as signs of weakness. this president thinks history began with this administration. when we encourage muslim brotherhood movements around the region and disregard king abdullah and other friends in the arab world we are giving encouragement to those that are going to try to overthrow them. get ready, things will get worse there. >> sean: and king abdullah is a wolf in sheep's clothing. what do you think he'll do with the money and tanks we give them? >> i think he should apology the things he said. i think it's pursuing the milit
the gavel. they are changing the tone in the committee and they are doing it by taking a more wholistic approach to what armed services means. for example, this issue which is really important and in addition to those three women who are now on the subcommittees on the armed services committee, you have claire mccaskill who was very outspoken this week about the incident that representative braley described. >> kristen gillibrand right now. leon panetta used this to put new rules into place and chuck hagel is looking into this case that we mentioned earlier. what do you think? does the legislation have a thought? >> i think it will be an early test for chuck hagel. this was a big issue for some of the key senators who are here, like barbara boxer, claire mccaskill, those senators really made this an issue for hagel and he said, look, i am going to make this a priority in terms of looking at whether or not the military justice system needs to be reformed. and now he's got -- now he's got a decision to make because pressure is certainly going to build from this hearing today and legislati
the "wall street journal," columnist says something has changed, a line has been crossed. does it feel that way in washington? >> now, i think so republicans learned a pretty good lesson this week. the president overhyped this thing electing like y 2 q, he couldn't back up his -- y2k ands president's bluff. we're not talking about a massive cut here in spending. we're talking about a minor cut in the growth of spending. i think our country wants to see us get serious about spending and i think the party learned a good lesson to stand up to the president, being very clear offering solutions to problems. at the end of the day if the president isn't willing to lead and anything he is interested in campaigning earnings this we have to stick together and show the american people that we're not going to drive this country into the ground. >> dana: one of the things i have seen from democrats and even just outside of the party politics, from the left is that we actually don't have a spending problem. this is a new talking point. just looking at the polls, actually one thing americans can agre
is that the law on this type of issue, especially as it relates to material support of terrorism, actually changed in 2006 and so it may be that they won't be able to reach back because the constitution and try him before that time. let's listen to one constitutional law expert i spoke with. >> until now, we thought that we could try them under these charges in the military commission system and it looks like it's not going to turn out that way which means that material support charges can be tried in the federal court system as they always have and they are highly successful in terms of bringing indictments and in terms of bringing convictions. >> so, wolf, we expect to hear a lot more about this suspect tomorrow with that presentment in federal court in new york city. >> we'll see who represents him in that as well in federal court. thank you very much, joe johns. let's dig deeper with senator ron wyden of oregon. he's a member of the intelligence committee. your immediate reaction that we learned to the news today. you may have learned about it longer than we did. what do you think of the decis
archbishop of buenos aires was elected by the cardinals yesterday in a strong religion of changing die nam milks. he was selected on the fifth round of voting. at the secret conclave. his name announced for a crowd of over a hundred thousand people gathered in st. peters square. that was quite a sight, mike barnicle, to watch unfold. >> the theater, the theater of the church is unmatched, unparalleled when you consider the ramifications of what we all watched yesterday. hundreds of thousands of people in st. peters square and millions around the world watching this. everything in doubt until those doors opened. the theater of black smoke and white smoke. there was no red state, blue state, no chuck todd standing in front of a map announcing winners. >> not that we don't love that. >> i know, i know. >> it's all go. >> not that there is anything wrong with that. >> until that door opened, we did not know who the next pope would be and the significance of the choice is overwhelming as well. the pope crosses the ocean to latin america. first time it's happened as you pointed out, joe. >> righ
that somebody has to be their friend, i suppose you can force the child to say this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that's it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> it's like saying you can vote, you can travel, but you cannot be a citizen. there are certain labels in this country that are critical. you could have said in the loving case, you can't get married, but you can have an interracial union. everyone would know that was wrong. >> john roberts and ted olson arguing about whether this "marriage" label means something, or if you can have first-class citizenship while the state still bans you from having that label, that one thing. if you wanted to know today if there was any good old fashioned homophobic ignorance in the court, yes, there was, on the wings of a dove named antonin scalia. he was trying to help out the lawyer arguing the anti gay rights side. he starts out trying to help the lawyer and goes right off the cliff. >
and have you changed your mind about him. >>> this is "piers morgan live." the first full day for pope francis begins with private prayer. he was at the main basilica for about 30 minutes before turning to the sistine chapel for his first mass, in italian. he asked the cardinals to have courage and said the church must move forward, a job that begins in earnest now that he's in charge. my first guests have a lot to say about the new pope and that's just for starters. mia farrow and martin sheen, hollywood icons, devout catholics and political activists. they join me now along with an impressive young man, craig kielburger who began the organization free the children. welcome to you all. i'm very excited about this. mia farrow, martin sheen making their debuts on "piers morgan live," two of my favorite actors in history. how about that. >> thank you. thank you. >> i don't want to blow too much smoke in your direction but let's just get that out of the way straight away. given that we're all catholic, all four of us are catholics. we will start with the pope. it was a momentous day yeste
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're taking corporate contributions. that's a big change. >> why are they doing this? why would the president -- it just seems like he's making his life more complicated politically. why would he do this? >> i think they want to take the strength of their grassroots operation, their access to money, and try to marry them up so he can succeed in the midterms. so he can do in the last two years of his second term what he did in the first two years of his first term. they think the only way to do that is fight the chamber of commerce, fight corporate money. >> i'm not shocked by it. it's just pretty -- not shocked by the practice because it's how washington's run forever. i'm just very surprised, as you pointed out. even taking corporate money to do this. we're a long, long way -- >> okay. i want to get to the thriller in bloomberg. that doesn't work. last night in his debate with "new york times" columnist, joe raised some concerns about spending and long-term debt, particularly with an ageing population, reaching retirement age. take a look. >> we should have used the '90s. we should have used
been an attitude change? >> there has definitely been an attitude change in south carolina. and we see it moving rapidly, as a matter of fact. now south carolina is a state that does not -- does not allow same-sex marriage. but we'll see where that takes us in ten years. there is a definite movement, a definite change of attitude in south carolina, yes. >> okay. let's say you win the primary, and then it's, of course, i would pick maybe mark sanford on the other side. i don't know what the polling is there, but it would certainly be great to see you defeat him. could you defeat him? >> well, ed, let me be really clear about something first. we have got to get through the first primary, march 19th. and i do have -- i do have a competitor, as you mentioned. and so right now this campaign is focused on getting through that primary, getting the vote out, and winning the democratic seat. and as you so aptly mentioned, there are so many republicans at this point that we have no idea who is going to shake out. and until that shakes out, we're going to keep our eye on the prize. >> all right.
can't come in here and tell me what to do. and that's one of his trademark signals. he'll never change that. >> all right. o'reilly often resorts to finger-pointing. but what does it tell you about how he handles conflict? is he a very domineering guy? >> it's a dominant personality trait. when people do that, they typically do it in a way to say that i'm this one who is in charge here. and that's why over the years we've seen that politicians have changed from like the finger-point to a more lighter point so that people don't feel offended. because when someone points at you, there is an opportunity for you to feel offended. does it mean you always will? no, but there is a chance. >> all right. tanya reiman, great to have you with us. >> thank you. >> thank you so much for joining us here on "the ed show." that is "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. >> i've never been more self-conscious about how i talk and flap my hands around than hearing you talk to the body language expert. i have to be a robot now. i'm doing everything wrong. i'm showing my
because the times they are changing. >> what is different about this vehicle is it is more compact. >> lieutenant peter is showing off pleasant hill's newest police car. it's called a police intercepter, but looks more like a ford taurus. it has front wheel drive and a more fuel efficient engine and designed to handle all the modern communications equipment. >> this car was built with all the electronics in mind. so it's more efficient and you don't have to worry about dead batteries and things like that. >> demand for leaner cars has caused exeans like ford, gm, and dodge to retool their offerings, but these vehicles are the work space for patrol officers and they'll have to get used to less spacious surroundings. >> officers nowadays, many more are much more physically fit and they can sit in a vehicle a lot better. >> the tighter quarters will be noticeable for those who end up in the backseat as well. >> i don't think it would be a comfortable fit. fortunately, pleasant hill isn't that large of a city. so the trip from anywhere, some person got arrested to the jail isn't
carney insists in a one-page plan on the white house website, the president has more detail about changes to major programs like medicare and social security. >> have you looked at the ryan budget? can you sipe a single item in tax reform, single loophole to close $5 trillion. that is a lot of money? not one. >> reporter: as the president went behind closed doors today with the senate democrats, senator patry murray released their budget plan and medicare and medicaid alone, raising questions about whether the president will be able to get his fellow democrats to support the entitlement reform he has pledged with house leader nancy pelosi suggesting to cnn she does not want to touch entitlements. >> if the point of it is to take trophies, that doesn't save money. it's a trophy. it's a scalp. but not a solution. >> tomorrow, the president meets with the white house republicans, amid questions about whether the outreach is for show. after an unnamed white house official told "national journal" this is a joke. we're wasting the president's time and ours. i hope you all in the media are happy
conservative from ohio will be known for something else, changing his hard-line position against gay marriage, which he revealed to cnn. and the very personal reason behind his reversal. >> i'm announcing today a change of heart. on an issue that a lot of people feel strongly about. and it has to do with gay couples' opportunity to marry. i've come to the conclusion that for me, personally, i think this is something that we should allow people to do, to get married, and to have the joy, and the stability of marriage that i've had for over 26 years. i want all three of my kids to have it, including our son who is gay. >> reporter: that unexpected revelation came from portman's 21-year-old son will two years ago. >> my son came to jane, my wife and i, told us that he was gay. and that it was not a choice. and that, you know, he -- that's just part of who he is and he's been that way ever since he could remember. >> what was your reaction when he told you? >> love. support. you know, 110%. >> reporter: surprised? >> surprise, yeah. >> reporter: you had no idea? >> no idea. yeah. and, you know, a
is the changed cpi, which is really like a technical fix and inflation goes up and down and spending, it's not reform, it's something that the government should be doing anyway, and he this week, a wall street journal headline, president obama tries to woo democrats over to his side. so his problem is not with the republicans, he would probably be able to triangulate with them. the problem is on his left. where are they? you always see, there's always some courageous member of a party who stands up against his own leadership to say this is just wrong. on the democratic side i'm sure there's grumbling and i hear about it, but where is the courageous person who is going to make that public? >> nowhere. i mean, come on, it was left to rand paul to say anything about the drums. you didn't see anything, ron wyden, no one to stand up for profiles in courage in anything that i can tell. dana is right the reason that republicans are saying why hasn't-- why hasn't the senate proposed a budget or passed a budget, it's because the democrats can't agree on it. if it's within their own caucus that th
. we certainly hope that the president will change his mind and submit a plan that actually balances the budget. >> the senate plans to vote on the dueling plans and a whole series of amendments tomorrow. democrats say they favor a balanceed approach and republicans say they back a budget. >> bret: mike emanuel live on the hill. dow lost 90. s&p 500 dropped 13. the nasdaq fell 32. cyprus is officially on the clock. european bankers have given cyprus four days to come up with a new plan to avoid bankruptcy. senior foreign affairs greg palkot tells us what the hurry is. >> anger outside of the cyprus parliament. bank employees are worried they will lose their job. the both would take measure to consolidate the troubled cypriot financial failure to protect the smaller deposito depositors, said to be part of plan "b" to contribute to multibillion dollar bail out by the country. >> there is only one tactic. to save our economy and our country. >> the original plan for cyprus to tap in private bank account. it was nixed by officials after widespread outrage. a new approach includes a solid
haven't changed a lot. sentiment, however, has. we are seeing investors become more confident in equities. our clients will have to set up the time horizon and hit a portfolio that really meets the goal that they are trying to accomplish. >> i didn't hear you mention the word cyprus once in that first paragraph or two of your thinking. do you think that the worries over cyprus are overblown? >> it is very small. it is .2% of the e.u. forget the global markets. it is very, very small. cyprus has the potential to represent contagion. if cyprus like greece before, if that were to infect let's say spain or italy it would become an issue. if it doesn't it becomes localized. the big issue in cyprus that is troublesome is they have their version of the fdic which is deposit insurance. that is rule of law. if they were to break that for financing purposes that would be very, very different. cyprus when you compare that to the u.s. housing which is positive and may be offsetting in terms of what washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let'
change has a lot to do with the people supporting your side of the case p. >> i think the c change has to do with what was discussed in bowers and morns, which the understanding there was no difference that could justify in categorical discrimination. >> you don't doubt that the lobby supporting the enactment of same-sex marriage laws in different states is politically powerful, do you? >> with respect to that categorization of the term for purposes of scrutiny, i would, your honor. >> really? >> yes. >> as far as i can tell, political figures are falling over themselves to endorse your side of the case. >> the fact of the matter is that no other group in history has been subjected to collude those rights as gay people. only two of those referendums have lost. one was in minnesota that already has a statute on the books preventing gay marriage. so i don't think the political power of gay people today could possibly be seen in a framework. i think gay people were weaker than women were. >> you just referred to a c change in people's understanding and values from 1996 when doma was enact
the defendant with hundreds of questions about her boyfriend's murder including why her version of event changed three times and why she can't remember some of the most gruesome details. >> how can you say you don't have memory issues when you can't remember how you stabbed him so many times and slashed his throat? >> well, i think that i have a good memory. june 4 is an anomaly for me. i don't think that i have memory issues that are any different from another average person. >> arizona is one of just three states that allows jurors to question witnesses at a criminal trial. >>> several florida beaches are open this morning after thousands of sharks prompted life guards to close them. the sharks are migrating up the coast as the water with starts to warm for the summer. this happens every year which is scary to think about. deerfield beach was one of the cled shorelines because of the shark sightings. >>> another close encounter today. scientists say another asteroid, this one the size of a football field, will whiz past earth this happening. this is happening just days after a smaller rock mad
, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that, it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> that is the voice of chief justice john roberts there. >> if you're over the age of 55, you don't help us serve the government's interest and regulate through marriage so why is that different? >> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both parties to the couple are infertile and the traditional. >> no, because if a couple -- i can just assure you if both the woman and the man are over the age of 55, there are not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> that's elena kagan right there. jonathan capehart, how old were you? seriously? >> no. move on. >> no. this is good. this is a fair question. >> not over 50. >> jonathan, let's start our conversation with you. it's always a treat to listen into the supreme court. we don't get to hear that very often. what did you take away from what you heard yesterday? >
of a movement to change the way americans think about guns. welcome to you both. read about you in "the new york times." a fascinating place to start this debate as far as you're concerned because you don't like using the phrase "gun control." maybe that's the most inflammatory part of this debate, the word "control." you prefer to use "safety." tell me about evolve and what the purpose is. >> the purpose of evolve is to become an aspirational brand, something that lives above some of the chatter or if you can think about being more transformational. a lot going on out there is very important but it's incremental, and in order to change culture, we're reframing the conversation. you have to come at it from a different perspective. >> how are you going to change the way americans think about guns? >> well, i think if you go back to just being consistent with culture, culture is really what makes things change and stick in america. so if you take gun control, which you brought up, control versus freedom. control is counterculture. it's not american. freedom is american. that is a bad, bad, you kno
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